Holistic Dentistry – Lecture by Paige Woods, DDS at UCSD

FULL TRANSCRIPTION:


Intro: Good afternoon, everybody. Good morning, everybody. I’m really happy to see you here. Welcome to San Diego. I hope that you will have a very enlightened time here. And hopefully, we’ll get to answer a lot of your questions.

I wanted to introduce to you a very, very special person, who I’m very fond of on many levels. She’s a terrific human being. She is a very smart, charismatic, caring person, and an incredibly good dentist. So, please help me welcome Dr. Paige Woods.

Dr. Paige Woods: Thank you. Thank you so much. I’m so happy to be here with you guys today. I’m a biological dentist in San Diego, and what makes it even more special to be here at UCSD talking to you guys about what I do.

So, let’s get started. You know, I’m constantly asked. People ask me where should they go to research, where should they go to find out what’s best for them. I know that with social media and with the Internet, if a patient gets a cough and they go to WebMD, they’re going to think they have cancer. So, we’re given tons of information, but who’s right?

And what I always tell my patients is, first and foremost, you have to trust yourself. If something doesn’t smell right, doesn’t sit with you right, then trust yourself and keep digging.

And that’s basically how I wrote my practice. And why my patients come to me is because they have kept pushing the limit and pushing the boundaries and asking why. Stepping away from the social norms, they find their way to me.

So, why do we need to take responsibility of our health? In dentistry, we’re taught to restore teeth. We’re given this list of materials and we learned everything there is to know about it –the bond strength, the compression strength, the sheer strength, everything you can possibly know, elasticity. But there’s no aspect really on the bio-compatibility of these materials—which I’ve always had an issue with it.

So, I think that that’s another thing that’s missing in this field. We have dental amalgams, for instance. They contain mercury. And we’ll talk about this a lot during this lecture. But another thing is for my pediatric patients. When they have decay that extends to the nerve, the standard of care is to remove the decay. We take a piece of cotton, we dip into formocresol which has formaldehyde in it, and we soak that tooth with this material. Formaldehyde is carcinogenic. It’s known to be carcinogenic. And then we have root canal sealers that are toxic as well.

So, there are all of these things that we’re putting into our mouths that contain non-toxic materials. By just stepping aside and asking, “Wait, what?” I think that that’s what makes us intelligent human beings.

We’ll get to some of these other things a little bit later, but just start kind of planting the seed.

So, my hope for you today is to provide you guys with a litte bit of knowledge to take with you to your healthcare provider and make sure that you’re getting the care that you want.

So, when patients come to me every day, these are the number one concerns that they have. They want to know about their silver fillings. Are they toxic? Are they good for them? Are they hurting them? What’s the deal, just the different metals on their mouth?

Root canals, root canals is another big issue right now as well as gum disease.

So, our mercury fillings, 50% mercury. So, aside from being 50% mercury, this is some of the things that we see everday. And just looking at the pictures, you have to ask yourself, “Do I want this in my mouth?” Let’s take mercury out of the equation. Do I still want this rusting piece of metal in my mouth?

So, aside from that, now let’s talk about the composition. It is 50% mercury. And that’s not according to me. That’s according to Health &Human Services which is the government.

We have these mercury restorations. How did we get it? Well, it goes back a long ways. It goes back to 1833 when two Frenchmen brought it over. They realized it was an easy to use material. They were able to place them into teeth and restore these teeth. We didn’t have anything else, and patients were able to function.
So, 10 years later, that was the standard of care. Everyone was using it. It makes sense.

But the American Society of Dental Surgeons caught on to the fact—and they were the ones that said, “Hey, it’s got 50% mercury. How can this be okay for the patient? How can this be healthy?” They wanted to eliminate it. And instead of that being eliminated, the mercury fillings being eliminated, the American Dental Association was founded and the American Society of Dental Surgeons was disbanded. So, the ADA has been a strong proponent of dental amalgam ever since.

So, as I was saying, mercury was one of the most toxic elements. It’s actually the third most toxic element according to Health & Human Services behind arsenic and lead. This is not me. This is not me telling you how to live your life, me telling you something is good or bad. This is the government. This is Health & Human Services telling you that mercury is the third most toxic substance and 50% of these fillings are mercury.

So, if that hasn’t convinced you enough, when you go to your dentist or in my own office—well, I don’t have this metal in my office. But if your dentist does have it in their office, this is a label from one of the containers that contains the mercury or amalgam for placing in these restorations. And right here, it says, “Warning: May cause neurotoxic and nephrotoxic effects.” So, you’re going to have neurotoxic and kidney devastating effects. This is the label. So that’s the toxicity based on the mercury content.

Let’s talk about just the fact of having the metal on your mouth. So if you think about highschool chemistry, highschool science classes, when you heat up a metal, it expands. You eat hot and cold food, this metal expands and contracts.

Well, teeth are really strong when they’re whole and there hasn’t been anything placed in them. You can put a lot of pressure. I mean, we put 250 lbs. of pressure on our molars. So, we have really strong jaws. But now you have a wedge inside of your tooth that’s expanding and contracting and it’s creating these cracks, and also, open margins. So, it expands, contracts, expands, contracts. You have all these openings for bacteria. Microscopic bacteria just flows right in.

So, aside from the toxicity effect, it’s also not a good restorable material based on the devastating effects long-term.

I can’t tell you how many clients—everyday, I do at least one (and mostly like two to three crowns) a day just because of the fractures that occur with these restorations.

Once we remove the amalgam—actually, this is a really nice picture. I know, this is not bad. But you can actually see here, you see this crack, it runs all the way across, all the way across. And sometimes, these teeth, this crack runs so deep that it runs to the root of the tooth and the tooth actually has to be extracted. So, a simple filling turns into a tooth extraction.

But there is good news. We are able to remove these amalgams in a safe way and restore them. This is a case from our office. We removed the metal, the mercury fillings, and we replaced it with some porcelain inlays and onlays. It looks much better.

So, a lot of times, my patients come in, and they’ve done a little bit of research—I’m really happy that they have. They’re on the right path. They’ve made the decision to have these toxic restorations removed—and they want to know what my protocol of choice is, if it’s Huggins or International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology. These are all very great protocols. The fact that they’re removing these toxic restorations, A+.

But you’re taking your eye off the 8 ball. The key is making sure that none of these metal and this metal material is going to be ingested or inhaled when we remove it. And that all starts with this nice sealed rubber dam.

This is water-tight. We test it. Once we put this on, we put a clamp, we test it with water, we ask the patient, “Are you getting anything in?” before we even do this.

We add a second layer of protection. We use some homeopathy remedies to make sure. We give our patients a couple of tablets. If anything gets in—which it doesn’t—if anything does, it allows the body to flush that mercury out rather than being absorbed into the fatty tissues.

So, we have our rubber dam, our sealed rubber dam. We place an oxygen mask over the patient’s nose to make sure that none of these toxic gas is being inhaled.

And we section out the metal pieces. We section it out. We use electric hand pieces that we’re able to put the RPMs way down, so that it doesn’t heat up this metal too much, and we section these pieces out.

So again, this goes over our protocol that we used in our office. And we’ve had great success. We kind of combined a couple of different protocols, and it works.

So, some other things your dentist should be using in the office is homeopathy, acupuncture, a lot of natural ventilation, nutritional guidance, and of course, quadrant dentistry. We want to take care of each quadrant at a time.

So, once you remove these metal fillings, then what? What are we going to replace them with?

So, we have a couple of different options. We have composites and we have porcelain. Composites is basically plastic and glass. It’s not baked. And then, you have porcelain which is baked glass.

With the composites, unfortunately, at this point in time, we don’t have a perfect material. We have two types of composites. Ninety-nine percent of the composites out there in the market now contain BPAs. In my office, it doesn’t have BPAs in it, but it does have a little bit of flouride which we’re not a fan of. We don’t use flouride in our office, but this is the one material that does have it. We just find that we would rather sacrifice and have a minute amount of flouride versus containing a large amount of BPAs. We tend to go that way.

When I’m talking over these issues with what the options are with my patients, I put it really simply as, “Would you rather eat your food on a China plate or a plastic plate?” It’s up to them. But at least the choices are known.

So, I think that more and more dentists are starting to join and they’re starting to realize that these mercury fillings or amalgam fillings are not healthy. I’m actually really happy to see that dentistry is changing course. It’s taken a long time I think from what, 1833 to now. We’re starting to slowly move away, but we’re getting there.
So, oral and systemic disease, it’s all connected. There had been countless of research done showing that there was a direct connection between periodontal disease. And that’s been known for 15 years at least—hardcore evidence.

And then, lately, the ADA came out with a study that said that there actually isn’t. But I think that there’s more to that. I don’t believe that. I think that due to malpractice, if a periodontal condition isn’t seen or diagnosed, that the dentist is going to be liable for malpractice with their heart disease. So, I don’t believe that. There’s just too much evidence showing otherwise.

In the gums, you have a large amount of vasculature; in the teeth, you do as well. And it’s a direct connection to your heart. It’s commonsense.

So, what is periodontal disease is when we have a patient that has a large amount of bacteria that basically starts to form here. And it eats away. It’s anaerobic bacteria, so it doesn’t like oxygen.

So, when I have a patient that has four, five, six millimeter pockets, they’re not able to clean here. A normal toothbrush can get two to three millimeters if you’re really diligent. But once we get past that, this bacteria is just having a field day. It’s just going to town.

This is actually really interesting. So, some of that bacteria that we found in the bottoms of those pockets that I just showed you, they also found that same bacteria in patients that have pancreatic cancer. And yet, it’s not all connected.

So, how do you know if you have periodontal disease? Here, we have some areas where we have moderate gingivitis, and we’re getting into some moderate periodontitis here. You can see the recession, the gum tissue. And then, when you get to the more advanced—and we see this in our office actually more frequently than you would realize.

How do we treat it? In our office, we take a little bit of a different approach. Of course, we want to use our traditional hygiene—brush, floss. But with our patients, we find that the biggest resource that we can have is by their homecare.

You come to our office, you see our hygienist every four months? Then how is that bacteria being eliminated between then? I mean, do you clean your house every four months? No! You need a maintenance every day to allow new growth to attach to that tooth.
So, in our practice, we use ozone because it’s three molecules of oxygen. When you have these anaerobic bacteria, bacteria that hates oxygen, and you’re throwing three oxygen molecules at it, it’s the most we can do to try to eliminate this bacteria.

So, we have our patients buy a water pick. It doesn’t have to be anything fancy. We just want a reservoir. We have them buy an ozone machine. You ozonate the water, and they basically put the ozone water, the ozone-infused water down into those pockets. That helps to eradicate that bacteria. And by doing that every day, we’re seeing these four, five, six millimeter pockets become those two, three and four—and even better.

And here are some of the statistics for an ozone machine that we recommend. Feel free to email me about this so we can help you.

And again, this is just talking about the water pick. I even have all my ortho patients, I tell them to use it because it’s harder to floss. The most important thing to realize is you’re just trying to flush that bacteria out.

I don’t want to say that it’s not important to keep coming to your hygienist. It absolutely is. You need to have the tartar removed. We learned how to brush our teeth when we’re really young. We all kind of get in there and go to town, but there are places that we miss. So, you have to continue to come to your hygienist and keep having these pockets measured to make sure that we’re getting new reattachment.

So, aside from hygiene and using ozone, some other things that we see that causes increased periodontal pockets and periodontal disease is a lot of crowding. Our teeth are supposed to be aligned in a certain fashion to where your saliva just flows through and it eliminates naturally this bacteria. But when you have all of these crowding, even the patient with the most diligent hygiene, it’s almost impossible. They’re just set up for failure. You’re going to see a plaque trapped here. You’re going to see it here.

Not only that, a lot of times, when they have this, some teeth are being worn more than others. You’ll see a lot of wear on the biting surfaces of the back teeth. So, we absolutely want—of course, there’s an aesthetic component of the braces which that’s the majority of why people get them. But what I care about is just the health of their mouth and eliminating these pockets and areas for bacteria to sequester.

So, it’s not perfect for every patient, but a lot of our patients are able to use these clear braces. They’re BPA-free. A lot of times, our patients don’t want to have metal in their mouth. So, this is a great alternative.

Okay! So, the big hot topic is root canals. I see patients every day. They’ve done a lot of research, and they want to know, “Is this root canal causing cancer? Is this root canal hurting me? Is it making me sick?” That’s a valid question. So, what is a root canal?
So, inside of this canal, you have a nerve, you have an artery and you have a vein. And when you have decay or trauma or something that causes this nerve to die, we have to have it removed.
So, we open the tooth. We open this up and clean all of these out and fill this area. That is a root canal.

So, traditional root canals are done with Gutta Percha and that sealant—that sealant that I was telling you about that’s made of a really toxic material. We have more bio-compatible materials now thankfully that I will recommend to some of my patients depending on their own situation.

So, traditional root canal materials, it’s a hydrophobic material. So, when it comes into contact with moisture, it actually starts to shrink. And over time, these materials shrink anyway.
So, if you think about this, when you fill this area with a material that’s starting to shrink and get smaller, it basically becomes a place where bacterial can just come and re-infest this canal. Whereas the new bio-compatible materials that are on the market and that we use in our office, when it comes into contact with moisture, it actually expands. So, it eliminates any of those pocketings or voids for bacteria to enter. And again, this is the traditional root canal material.

So, aside from whether or not we can do root canals with the bio-compatible materials or not, most of the patients that come in have done some research and they have come across Dr. Weston Price.

So, in 1920, Dr. Price did a study where he took some root canal treated tooth from some patients that had some systemic conditions. One patient had had a heart attack, and they took this tooth out. Another patient had diabetes. So, they had some of these root canal-treated teeth. He implanted them under the skin of some rabbits.

Eighty-eight percent of those rabbits developed the systemic condition that the patient had had that had the root canal-treated tooth. For instance, one of the patients had a heart attack. The rabbit had a heart attack after having this root canal placed under the tissue.

So, not only Weston Price, but the Mayo Clinic also had research as well showing the bacteria lodged in these root canal-treated teeth were connected to some of these systemic conditions.

So now that we know that, what do we do? That’s what my patients come to me. They’ve done this research. They have this information. They have this knowledge. It’s out there. It’s not a secret. What do we do?

This is the part that I love about my job. It’s because each patient is unlike any other patient.

So, we evaluate the tooth. I look at their situation. We look at the tooth. Does it have an infection? If it does have an infection, is it a tooth that they need for chewing? If we extract it, are we going to be able to utilize other teeth around it to replace it with a bridge? Do we have enough bone there for an implant?

These are the questions that I ask myself, ask the patient. We have to come up with a gameplan.

We also look at the systemic conditions of a patient. If this tooth is on a meridian where they have some other manifestation—let’s say they have a premolar that is infected and they have breast cancer along that meridian—I’m absolutely going to say, “No way! Get it out.” So, every case is evaluated individually.

Systemic manifestations on that meridian, are there life-threatening health challenges. Do we want to add to that possibility of introducing more bacteria into their system or is it better just to get rid of it completely? At the end of the day, it’s just a tooth. Their life matters more.

So, here are some examples of our tooth-organ relationship. Like I was saying, with the premolar, any breast cancer, thyroid, we’re not going to want to mess with that, a lower molar—and this is all online, this tooth-organ relationship. So, if you have any root canals that you’ve been questioning having re-treated or having removed, you can look this up and evaluate it.

So, with the bio-compatible option, if there is not a systemic condition along that meridian and the tooth is needed for function, then we do have an option. And this is what I will talk to my patients about.

So, it doesn’t use Gutta Percha, and it doesn’t have the hydrophobic sealers. It has this hydrophilic points that actually expand.
And here’s a research article basically talking about how it will expand when it comes into contact with moisture.

A little bit more about this study. I don’t want to bore you guys. You guys can look this up.

So, what’s my position on the root canals? I’m not an advocate for it. I’m totally opposed to it when it’s used with traditional materials. But it’s not off the table. I feel like that’s doing a disservice to my patients. I don’t want my patients to think if they come to me, we’ll have all your root canals removed. I can’t buy that.

But each patient, they’re an individual. They’re unlike anyone else. I need them to come to my office. Let’s sit down, let’s talk about it, let’s evaluate their case individually.

So, let’s say that we’ve decided to actually remove the tooth, then what are our options? Do we just leave it alone? Absolutely not. We have options.

So, what is the best thing? We have implants, bridges and removable partials. Maryland bridges aren’t done very much these days just because it takes a lot of maintenance. You have to have them recemented every few years or so. We’ll talk about it, but I think people are more in line with implants and bridges.

So, an implant is a titanium or a zirconium screw that’s put into the bone. We allow it to heal for a few months. And then ,we uncover it and then we can place a crown on it.

During those four months, the body will osteointegrate and basically move into the threads of this implant, and it’s accepted as part of the body and part of the bone.

You can see the threads. There’s bone going straight into these. It’s totally integrated. It’s solid.

Zirconia implants are also on the market. The problem with these right now is that it’s all one piece here—not to mention that it’s larger. So, it’s a ceramic implant. It has to be larger so that it can take on the mastication forces. You have all these micro-fractures that can occur if it’s smaller.

So, they’re still in the research and development phase right now. With it being one piece, the patient is able to actually bite on it immediately which I’m not a fan of because it’s not allowing the bone to actually integrate into the implant.

So, there is hope for having zirconia implants. They have come out with something that has two individual pieces, but they’re having problems with the attachment of the two pieces. So, for now, I’m not ready to advice my patients to go in this direction until I see a little bit more success. So, there are options.

If they don’t have enough bone, and there aren’t teeth for an implant—I mean for a bridge—then we can do something that’s removable to help them to bite.

This is what we do in the majority of cases. If a patient has restorations on two adjacent teeth here and we have to remove a tooth, then it’s kind of killing two birds with one stone. We can clean up those two adjacent teeth and place a bridge, a porcelain bridge.

If the two teeth are virgin teeth, then I would probably go more towards an implant.

And this is that Maryland bridge. This is not as common, but it’s still an option. So, you can ask your dentist how they feel and if you’re a candidate for them. Again, every case needs to be evaluated individually.

So, to reiterate, are there systemic manifestations along the meridien of the affected tooth? Are there life-threatening health challenges? And will intervention improve or decrease the quality of life? If we remove that tooth, are they not going to be able to eat on that side?

So, those are the things that we address in our office. I really appreciate you guys listening to what I have to say. Feel free to come and see us at Brighton Dental. Thank you. Thank you so much.

For a holistic dental consultation with Dr. Woods, call (619) 359-6569

What To Expect After Getting Dentures

post dentures infographic

 

The Effects of Dentures

Have you just gotten a pair of dentures for the first time? Are you considering investing in a pair of dentures to help heal any dental pain? If so, there are a few things you’ll need to keep in mind. While these dental fixtures can help you to get back to living normally and without dental problems, they do take some time to adjust to. Below is some information about dentures and what to expect.

Types of Dentures

Full and Partial Dentures

These are the two main types of dentures you’ll be able to choose from. A full denture will fit either your entire upper or lower gum while a partial denture is made to only fit a certain section of it, like part of your gum that’s missing only a few teeth.

Conventional Dentures

This is the type of dentures that is often used. This is the type that slips right over your top or upper gum. It’s very affordable and easy to wear which is why it tends to be the most popular type to use.

Immediate Dentures

This type is an option that will instantly replace any teeth, hence their name immediate dentures. The dentist will give you an immediate fixture to place over your teeth to help protect chipped or cracked teeth or hide discolored and rotting ones. This type often is used when gums shrink and normal dentures wouldn’t be enough to help with the current dental problems.

Overdentures

Similar to immediate dentures, overdentures slip right over where your regular teeth should be. Implants are installed in your gum and then a full denture is placed right over it.

Effects of Dentures

Dentures are helpful tools but can have some strange effects. Depending on the type of denture you choose you have to be careful when cleaning, removing, or wearing them.

Gagging

Sometimes the denture can feel a little awkward if you’re wearing it for the first time. Because of this, you might have a little bit of a gagging sensation when you wear them. However, this will eventually go away once you become accustomed to it.

Speaking and Eating Trouble

Speaking and eating might be a little difficult due to the denture not being perfectly shaped around your normal mouth structure. So, take things slowly and try to get used to them before diving into long conversations or big meals.

Uncomfortable Sensations

A denture might be a little uncomfortable to wear at first, but this will eventually go away the more you wear it because your mouth and gums will become used to it.

Irritation

When you first start wearing your new dental structure it might cause a little irritation on your raw gums. This is normal though and can be relieved by cleaning the dentures often or even placing ice cubes on your gums to help calm the inflammation down.

Dentures are helpful dental devices but can have some slight side effects once installed. Because of this, it’s important to consider the type of dentures you plan to use and ask your dentist how you can best wear them to ensure they’re comfortable to wear.

Homeopathy At The Dentist?

Homeopathy At The Dentist Infographic

 

Homeopathy and Dentistry

Homeopathy defined

This is a natural healthcare system that is currently used worldwide and has been in existence for more than 200 years. Homeopathy perceives each patient in their own unique way with an objective of quickening their individual ability to heal themselves. Homeopaths choose the best fitting medicine based on specific symptoms portrayed by an individual and their levels of personal health.

WHO recognizes homeopathy as the second most conspicuous system of therapy the world over. Homeopathy is quite popular in South America and India. Millions of people in Europe and around the globe utilize homeopathic treatment as well.

Reasons for popularity

  • Homeopathic treatment functions under the healing power of a patient’s body with an objective of achieving their good health and general wellbeing.
  • Homeopathy treats an individual according to their own unique condition and not as a collection often found in disease labels.
  • Homeopathic treatment covers all symptoms in every level of a person’s being, i.e. emotional, spiritual, physical, and mental, and identifies the accurate cure for each of the aspects.
  • Homeopathic remedies offer minimal doses that are gentle and powerful but also subtle. The medication is not addictive and is not tried on animals.

Homeopathy in dentistry

In the minds of many people, homeopathy is a controversial option of treatment. This is especially so for people in a medical profession. The reasoning for most people is that they don’t believe that a few tablets that don’t have large quantities of ingredients make any significant difference in patients. Homeopathy is a holistic dentistry branch. It is meant to view dentistry patients wholesomely instead of narrowing down to the problem in their mouth without paying attention to the rest of their bodies.

Arnica is one common homeopathic treatment type. There are a number of other homeopathic dentistry treatments though such as: Gelsemium used for nerves, Aconite for purpose of shock, Ledium meant to minimize pain during injection, Chamomilla meant to minimize numbness, and Zingiber for nausea and gagging.

Research and technological innovations have made it possible for patients to achieve much more in one dentist visit than what would otherwise be achieved in five or six dentist appointments 20 years ago.

Tooth sensitivity remedies

  • Pulsatilla is good for relieving heat sensitivity
  • Arnica is good for relieving pain generated from bruising
  • Magnesium phosphate relieves the shooting pain
  • Coffea relieves cold sensitivity
  • Staphisagria relieves pain accentuated by clenching
  • Merc Sol relieves the pain otherwise relieved by rubbing of the cheek
  • Aconite relieves pain caused by exposure to cold dry wind
  • Silica relieves pain accompanied by abscess or swelling
  • Belladonna relieves throbbing pain
  • Chamonilla or Hypericum relieves the pain which originates from the nerve

Some of the pain in the mouth originates from the teeth themselves although in some instances gum disease takes the blame. Homeopathic remedies that treat gum disease are more complex compared to the highlighted issues. It is therefore important to discuss the issue at hand with a qualified homeopathic dentist.

Homeopathy safety concerns

In the United States homeopathic remedies are considered safe and have been regulated since 1938. Homeopathy critics, however, believe that there is no substance with this solution. According to the critics the benefits accrued from this treatment are often not due to their effectiveness but because patients think they are effective. It is fundamental for patients to inform their medical doctors of their intention to seek homeopathic treatment for the purpose of getting advice on the best homeopathic remedies for their situation.

Oral Conscious Sedation For A Calming Dental Experience

oral conscious sedation infographic

 

Conscious Sedation in Dentistry for the Purpose of Alleviating Fear

Some people have a fear of the dentist for some reason. Many wonder how the anxiety feeling can be removed from their visits to a dentist. Some patients even faint during checkups, and some will even stay for long before seeing a dentist due to the anxiety, notwithstanding their dental issues. The anxiety and fear is, however, completely understandable. The fear of what could happen makes most people anxious. The inability to control what could happen may put people on edge. Other people abhor the idea of having another person put their hands inside their mouth.

Sedation dentistry

This is a form of dentistry that applies medication to assist patients in relaxing better during a dental procedure. Sometimes sleep dentistry is used in place of sedation dentistry. It must not be misconstrued to mean the general anesthesia. In this case patients are awake during the procedure.

Sedation levels

  • Minimal sedation is where a patient remains awake under relaxation.
  • Moderate sedation involves slight loss of consciousness. A patient may not recall most of the procedure.
  • In deep sedation the patient is barely conscious but they could still get woken up.
  • In general anesthesia the patient is completely unconscious of themselves.

Options to overcoming the anxiety

It is important to note that there is a solution to the anxiety and the fear. One of the extreme solutions is the option of having a complete sedation. This involves being completely numbed to sleep and only brought back to consciousness after the entire process of treatment has been completed. This option is only recommended for situations that are extreme. This is because there are many complications entailed. People with weaker hearts and the elderly may have serious problems with sedation. This type of treatment is not recommended for just any type of patient.

A professional dentist would prefer a discussion with the patient on how they have worked towards overcoming their anxiety and fear. Complete sedation may also be influenced by the extent of the dental problem at hand. For the patients suffering anxiety and fear they may have waited too long until their dental issues got out of hand therefore requiring some thorough surgical solutions to their problems.

Oral sedation: This sedation could be anywhere from minimal sedation to moderate sedation depending on the quantity of the dose given. Pills are often given to achieve minimal sedation. The pills given are often Halcion. The drug is taken one hour prior to the procedure.  The pill makes the patient drowsy but they still remain awake. Larger doses could also be given to achieve moderate sedation. This anesthesia type is often used in sedation dentistry. Some people will actually fall asleep from a dose intended to achieve moderate sedation. Such patients can, however, be awaken by a gentle shaking.

Oral conscious sedation is the other option. This is for the people who just find it hard to visit a dentist for reasons of anxiety and fear. The option can be the difference in such a case. It is always advisable to visit the dentist at least once a year. If the stay has been longer it is urgent that you subject the anxiety, fear, or procrastination to yourself. Wake up and go see the dentist before the dental issues get out of hand.

Brushing, Chewing Release Harmful Mercury Vapor From Amalgam Fillings, Experiment Proves

Some dental experts argue that when you mix toxic mercury with silver and other ingredients, it becomes a completely safe and stable dental restoration material. For decades, this material – called amalgam – has been used in fillings. Now, this Civil War era restoration material is shunned by many dentists, but lots of people still have dangerous mercury in their mouths – and it needs to be removed, as an experiment on the Dr. Oz show proves.

Mercury is a neurotoxin, and that’s why mercury-containing fillings are banned in some countries. In the United States, however, mercury amalgam is still allowed. But it shouldn’t be.

For dental patients unlucky enough to have silver-colored fillings, they could be the source of untold health problems. The solution is to remove these fillings and replace them with composite material or other restorations – something Dr. Paige Woods at Brighton Dental San Diego does for her patients under strict protocols designed to prevent additional harm.

Dr. Oz Steps In Where The ADA Won’t

Aside from damaging your own health with mercury-containing fillings, you’re releasing mercury into the atmosphere every time you brush, chew, grind your teeth or consume acidic beverages if you have silver fillings. Atmospheric mercury becomes methylmercury that contaminates fish. And consider how much mercury is released by dentists who still use amalgam in large quantities or dispose of old amalgam improperly.

Still, the American Dental Association advocates the use of dental amalgams, failing to acknowledge the problems or risks. In a recent survey, researchers found that as many as half of American dentists still use mercury amalgam.

On the Dr. Oz television program, Dr. Mehmet Oz participated in an experiment that proves the harmfulness of mercury fillings. Working with his hands inside a closed container with special air filtration and wearing heavy gloves, Dr. Oz used an ordinary toothbrush to brush for only a few seconds on some amalgam installed in a mouth replica. This quick brushing released 61 micrograms of mercury. If the mouth had been real, that mercury vapor could have crossed the blood-brain barrier and caused its neurological effects.

Take a look at the video. The experiment begins about 2 minutes in:

And people with mercury amalgam fillings brush, crew, grind and consume carbonated beverages every day. Interestingly, most of those who tried to refute the findings of the experiment admit that mercury vapor is released daily from amalgam, they just dispute how much harm it causes patients. But why not use dental composite – just as strong and better looking – instead?

While mercury vapor won’t instantly kill you, imagine the cumulative effect over time of having a neurotoxin installed in your body. You may question the credentials of Dr. Oz to perform dentistry experiments, but remember that the demonstration for his television show was based on laboratory demos. The International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology is among organizations that have made similar findings.

Put An End To A Personal Health Disaster

The Dr. Oz video very effectively demonstrates the dangers of having amalgam fillings. You can eliminate the release of colorless, odorless, tasteless and poisonous vapors into your body and into the environment by having Dr. Paige Woods replace your amalgam fillings with composite. Amalgam filling removal is one of the primary reasons people from across Southern California turn to Brighton Dental San Diego.

Stop the potential damage to your health and benefit from beautiful, tooth-colored composite fillings and other cosmetically pleasing restorations when you turn to Brighton and Dr. Woods.

Amalgam filling material is shipped to dental offices as hazardous material. It’s disposed of as hazardous waste. So why would anyone think it’s safe to have in your mouth? Call (619) 359-6569 to schedule your appointment.

Amalgam Removal & Homeopathics

amalgam removal infographic

 

Amalgam Removal

Using homeopathic remedies enables the smooth removal of amalgam. Dental amalgams have toxic mercury as a primary component. Many patients desirous of healthy dental formula prefer to have their amalgam fillings removed. In some instances removal of amalgam becomes necessary like in restoration. This might, however, cause complications when the amalgam gets disturbed. This is because the process can cause mercury to get released into the mouth of a patient and subsequently to their bloodstream.

Amalgam Fillings

It is important to know that mercury found inside amalgam fillings will be active and can get released in different degrees based on activity levels. Temperature levels influence the release of mercury. By drinking hot liquids more mercury is likely to get released than when cold drinks are used. When a person with amalgam fillings chews, grinds the teeth, or drinks, mercury gets released and then directly absorbed through the delicate stomach and mouth lining. Different studies have revealed that mercury can accumulate in the adrenal, pituitary, and brain glands. Other research studies indicate mercury as building up inside the brains of fetuses, livers, and kidneys. Mercury could also get passed into an infant through breastfeeding.

Determining the toxicity of Mercury

This can be found out through the analysis of hair mineral. Mercury gets stored in tissues. Analyzing the recently grown hair can reliably indicate the toxicity levels of mercury. A qualified nutritionist, naturopath, or homeopath can perform the test on behalf of a patient.

Using homeopathic remedies

These homeopathic remedies could be consumed a day prior to the removal of amalgam and the day that follows amalgam removal. Homeopathic remedies are small pellets that could be consumed from pill boxes. The homeopathic remedy is scientifically proven to cause some good impact for patients therefore assisting in making their treatment perform well and their bodies heal properly. The homeopathic remedy also has capacity to resist mercury toxins if some of the mercury gets released from the amalgam filling.

Effectiveness of homeopathic remedies

Homeopathy has been in use since the 1800s, and medical practitioners have used it as an excellent avenue of supporting conventional medicine. Modern medicine can only achieve success to a certain extent, and using homeopathy and similar medicines can assist in providing extra treatment for the patients who are likely to benefit more from better care. The possibilities are not restricted to the removal of amalgams or dental facilities but could also be employed in most medical settings.

Homeopathy is not designed to make mercury any less toxic. It is therefore important to get the amalgam removed by a qualified dentist. The capabilities of homeopathy remedies will assist in the prevention of disturbed mercury, during the treatment process, from inflicting any harm on the patient.

The twentieth century has seen many variant medications brought to life. This has contributed to the diminishing application of homeopathy. Most doctors and dentists are beginning to rediscover the incredible power of homeopathy. In Europe the treatment is well applied. Other parts of the world also understand the impact of homeopathy. As a matter of fact, it is quite likely that you have used homeopathy without noticing it in eye drops. Using the effectiveness of homeopathy can help avert any mercury disturbances during the process of treatment.

 

A Superior Denture Solution Option

Denture Solutions Infographic

 

Superior Permanent Denture Solution

Whenever a decision has to be made on which dentures to go for, it may get quite challenging due to the numerous available alternatives. A dentist must make sure to consider the most recent solution and the dentures with most benefits for their patients. Dental procedures must never be complicated beyond what they must be. With knowledge and skill, dentists can offer a perfect denture solution to patients. A dental patient wants to eat, laugh, chat, and feel comfortable without any embarrassment of having their teeth come out unintentionally.

Benefits of permanent dentures over the removable type

It is important to make sure any dental procedure does not put a perpetual state of pain and wait before a patient can regain normalcy in their daily life after treatment. For the patients who dread wearing their dentures every single day and having to remove them in the evening there is a permanent solution for them. Often removable dentures may leave a sore feeling on the gum. They may even have some irritating and inconveniencing movements. These problems can be avoided with quicker, cheaper, and faster solutions. Permanent dentures can be implanted with relative ease and the healing process takes less time. Implant dentures are an innovation whose time has come.

Implanted dentures: Implant dentures do not move around hence helping solve the problem of removable dentures. A patient can safely enjoy the presence of securely held teeth with an amazingly natural appearance. For patients who could not eat some types of foods it is a perfect opportunity to cure the problem. Implanted dentures make it possible for dental patients to regain their chewing abilities that loose dentures could not afford them.

Implanted permanent dentures are an advanced innovation in teeth replacement. If you lost teeth due to trauma, disease, accidents, etc. consider implanted dentures. Contrary to other tooth replacements modes, permanent implants are fashioned to emulate the original tooth root. They work by inserting an alloy post made of titanium into a patient’s jawbone with a minor surgical process. Patients need not get worried about anything because the process is quite fast. With a professional dentist handling the implant the process will be less painful.

Upon insertion of the alloy post the post will over time bond with the jawbone since some bone cells develop around and against the alloy hence making the post to become firmly held into position. Through the use of a small number of dental implants, the denture anchored on the implant will become solidly held into position. The denture will clip against the implants making it more rigid. The implanted dentures are solid and rigid enough to hold teeth bridges, hence making it possible to replace an entire column of naturally occurring teeth.

Suitable candidates for dental implants

Dental implants are naturally suitable for anyone. The only thing a patient needs is an assessment by a qualified dentist. The jawbone and medical history of a patient need to be examined before undertaking the procedure. Precautions are taken to safeguard the patient from any complications that may arise from a medication they are taking that could interfere with the healing process. Some details in the medical history could make a dental implant procedure completely unsuitable. A fairly reasonable general and dental health is appropriate for dental implants.