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Effective Treatment for Dental Cavitations

What is a Cavitation?

After a tooth extraction, the bone is supposed to regrow and fill up the spaces where the tooth once was. However, this is always not the case. The area may not heal or fill properly causing a hole or a spongy place in the jawbone known as a cavitation. It’s an area of dead bone and bone marrow. These holes occur when the periodontal ligament left behind blocks growth of new bone cutting off circulation of blood to the area. Expert postulate that this may be as a result of the presence of the periodontal membrane which causes the bone cells to have the notion that the tooth is still there.

Cavitations can also be found in other bone in the body, and can be initiated by almost anything that disrupts the bone tissues. Initiating factors includes but not limited to physical trauma, dental injections, bacteria trauma, anesthetic byproducts, and high-speed drilling. Predisposing factors include age chemotherapy for cancer, clotting disorders, bone dysplasia, and Lyme disease among others.

Inside a Cavitation

Cavitations are a breeding ground for bacteria. Inside the cavitation, anaerobic bacteria thrive and grow to produce metabolic waste which is toxic. These toxins are circulated throughout the body resulting in significant systematic effects. Cavitations have been found to cause chronic facial pain and can affect the body’s overall system by blocking the body’s energy meridians. The toxins produced can cause muscle and joint inflammations, migraines, digestion problems, and other chronic health conditions. The toxins have also been found to have adverse effects on the immune system. Research has shown that cavitations may harbor a large amount of mercury and other heavy metals. When some of the toxins combine with the mercury or other chemicals and heavy metals, more potent toxins may form.

Identifying Cavitations

Cavitations do not display the common effects of an infection such as swelling, redness or even increasing body temperature. They cannot be identified by visual inspection but can sometimes be detected by an x-ray. When an x-ray is taken, the tissue left behind once the tooth has been removed can form an image that looks like the shadow of a tooth. This phantom image sometimes indicates a cavitation. Unless the dentist is specifically looking for cavitation, the x-ray would appear without any issues. Other means of identifying cavitations includes the use of CAVITAT scanners, and Spect scans among others.

For diagnosis, a biopsy is surgically debrided from the area and a pathological review conducted. Once a cavitation is diagnosed we start the treatment. Different methods including surgery of the area can be used to treat the cavitations, depending on each patient’s situation.

Benefits of Cavitation Treatment

Cavitations have been found to cause adverse health issues; thus getting treatment for cavitations can have a lot of benefits. Cavitations treatment results in significant pain reduction. The treatment also provides relief for conditions that are associated with cavitation including trigeminal neuralgia, migraines, chronic sinusitis, and phantom toothache pain. It also helps eliminate toxins which can cause serious health conditions.

For a free cavitation treatment consultation with Dr. Woods, call 619-359-6569

Effective Treatment for Dental Cavitations
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  • Such articles make Dr Page a valuable resource for over all health. I always wondered why another dentist drilled so deep into my jaw bone when he removed a wisdom tooth. Now, years later, thanks to Dr Page,-- I know,---it was to prevent cavitation from any left over root.